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 Post subject: Expand to General H.G. Wells Website
PostPosted: Thu May 15, 2008 9:53 pm 
Tripod King

Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 12:07 am
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I'm not sure this is the best place to put this thread, so feel free to move it wherever you like.

Now that just about all the WOTW films have come out (except for the CGI one that may never appear), things seem to be winding down on this board. They'll wind down still more once the Martians' version of WOTW is finished in the Comics section in---what? A month? Two months? Three? It's been quite a ride, and it seems a shame to end it, so here's an idea: Why not expand the board to include discussions of ALL of H.G. Wells' work. This is a good time to do it, because all his works have been recently reprinted, while the long-ignored classic "The War in the Air" has been put out in trade paperback form, giving that novel its first appearance in half a century. Some discussion of his other work has cropped up on the board from time to time already, so it's not as though this would be a radical change.

What if that's not enough? Then expand it to "old-fashioned sci-fi" in general: work by Wells' contemporaries and near-contemporaries such as Jules Verne, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, William Hope Hodgson, etc. Can't you imagine a Doyle/Lost World board with threads like "Why Was Professor Challenger Such a Hothead?"

Edgar Rice Burroughs is most famous as the creator of Tarzan, but aside from that series and a host of unrelated westerns and other adventure novels, he also wrote an interplanetary adventure series taking place on Mars and another one on Venus, a prehistoric "lost world" series taking place in the Earth's core (Pellucidar), and another "lost world" taking place in a gigantic volcanic crater in the Antarctic (Caspak). Anyone remember the Discovery Channel's movie "Supervolcano" from a few years ago? Burroughs predicted that in his Caspak SF series a half century before regular science did. So why not cover him in a board? We can discuss things like why, even though he was an American, he made Tarzan English, and a nobleman, at that.

Well, that's my proposal, guys. What do you think of it?


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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 12:37 am 
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Martian War Lord

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Sounds like a good idea \:D/
I am familiar with all the authors you've mentioned here, although I only know of one short story by William Hope Hodgson 'The Voice in the Night'
You could also add to that list C.S. Lewis (I'm not talking about his Chronicles of Narnia) but his Cosmic trilogy. 'Out of the Silent Planet', 'Perelandra' and 'That Hideous strength' and there's John (The Triffid) Wyndham, one of my favorites along with H.P. Lovecraft.
I'm happy to leave this topic in this section of the forum if you are, I can't think of a better place to put it. :-k


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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 4:31 am 
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I still feel like a newbie here (in spite of my forum rank), but I like the expansion idea, too. I'd hate to see the forum just fade away, and if a reasonable expansion keeps it going, so much the better!


Insert witty, yet philosophical remark here...


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PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 3:05 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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craigr wrote:
I still feel like a newbie here (in spite of my forum rank), but I like the expansion idea, too. I'd hate to see the forum just fade away, and if a reasonable expansion keeps it going, so much the better!
So what sort of books are you into other than WotWs?


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PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2008 3:18 am 
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ME?
I used to avidly read as much SF as I could, back in high school & college. I also read a lot of history (especially WWII) and science. As I've gotten older, I've found less time to read, though I'm actively encouraging my kids to take an interest in it.

In my lifetime, I've read very little of the 'classic' SF authors like Wells, Verne or Burroughs. (It's been about 25 years since I read 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, and though I do own a complete paperback set of the Pellucidar series printed in the 1950's, I've yet to read it. It's been packed away for some time, and I shall read it before I die, I hope!)

Pause...

I just realised with some embarassment that I've read more short stories by Verne & Wells than I have read their novels, and even that's not very many in the grand scheme of things. I'm more an 'expert' about the movie adaptaions of their works than the literary works themselves. Sad, really.

As for CS Lewis, I've only read the Narnia series, and enjoyed it in spite of being ignorant of its religious allegory. (I was young when I read it.)

Methinks I need to find time to expand my literary horizons a bit. If I can't find the time to read, I should get audio books and listen to them on long commutes.

I do still read history & science books, though that doesn't really help this topic much. (As I mentioned in my intro thread, I have many varied interests.)


Insert witty, yet philosophical remark here...


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 9:51 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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craigr wrote:
Methinks I need to find time to expand my literary horizons a bit. If I can't find the time to read, I should get audio books and listen to them on long commutes.
If you're interested in audio book versions of the classic such as Wells, Verne, Burroughs to name a few, I can highly recommend this site http://librivox.org/newcatalog/ where you can listen to or download audio books free of charge and it's totally legal because all the books are in the public domain, \:D/ it's an audio book version of the Gutenberg project, the quality does vary quite a bit as the books are read by normal members of the public like you and me, having said that there are some good narrators out there, at the present I am listening to Jules Verne's' Mysterious Island. recorded by Mark Smith of Simpsonville, South Carolina. he does an excellent job and has recorded 15 books to date for Librivox including Wells' The First Men in the Moon. give it a try, it's worth it. :D


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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 10:35 pm 
Tripod King

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Regarding William Hope Hodgson, a company called Night Shade Books put out the entire collection of his works in two volumes: The Boats of the "Glen Carrig" and Other Nautical Adventures, and The House on the Borderland and Other Mysterious Places. The stuff was put out in 2003, and the company even gave its website as http://www.nightshadebooks.com, though I don't know if they're still there. If not, you'll have to search the used-book dealers. In addition, there's a major fanside on that part of the Internet owned by you Brits: THE NIGHT LAND, which IS still at its site at http://www.thenightland.co.uk/nightmap.html, so check it out. It has, among other things, a historical timeline for Hodgson's history of the Earth and universe, as well as a good collection of fiction based on his creation the Night Land, in the manner of later authors adding tales to those of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos.
Regarding my own sci fi and fantasy leanings, aside from the old masters I've already mentioned, I've made a study of the fantasy and sci fi of the pulp era of American magazines, with special emphasis on its three fantasy giants: Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, and Clark Ashton Smith. Oddly, I don't have much interest in most modern fantasy and sci fi, though I liked Harry Harrison's "West of Eden" trilogy and the first ten or so fantasy books in the "Dragonlance" series before my interest burned out. Oh, and I also got almost all the BattleTech novels put out by the now-defunct FASA Corporation of Chicago. So far, I've ignored the newer ones, which take place in a different age.


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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 1:14 am 
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Thanks, Lonesome Crow, I'll check out those audios soon!


Insert witty, yet philosophical remark here...


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PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 7:40 pm 
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Martian War Lord

Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 10:31 pm
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Alland wrote:
The stuff was put out in 2003, and the company even gave its website as http://www.nightshadebooks.com, though I don't know if they're still there. If not, you'll have to search the used-book dealers. In addition, there's a major fanside on that part of the Internet owned by you Brits: THE NIGHT LAND, which IS still at its site at http://www.thenightland.co.uk/nightmap.html, so check it out.

I don't know if it's just me but neither of those links work 'Page Not Found'
Alland wrote:
I've made a study of the fantasy and sci fi of the pulp era of American magazines, with special emphasis on its three fantasy giants: Robert E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, and Clark Ashton Smith. Oddly,

I am very familiar with Lovecraft, he was the sort of author who could be brilliant with his novels but his short stories always left me thinking "well that was a waste of 30 minutes"Just the opposite of Edgar Allan Poe, I find his short stories very intense and gripping whilst his novels like 'The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket' are rather long and boring.
I've heard of Robert E. Howard but never read him (Any titles you would recommend?) as for Clark Ashton Smith, I've not heard of him.
Alland wrote:
I don't have much interest in most modern fantasy and sci fi, though I liked Harry Harrison's "West of Eden" trilogy and the first ten or so fantasy books in the "Dragonlance" series before my interest burned out. Oh, and I also got almost all the BattleTech novels put out by the now-defunct FASA Corporation of Chicago. So far, I've ignored the newer ones, which take place in a different age.
I too prefer the classic Sci/fi and have read some of Harry Harrison's Stainless steel Rat books, very entertaining nonsense (and there's nothing wrong with that :lol: ).
I find that the modern Sci/fi novelist is just trying to show you how clever-clever they are and how totally weired they can be. I started reading Greg Egan's 'DIASPORA' The book starts with a 10 page glossary just in case you can't remember what the hell the author's talking about. I find a book like that hard work and frustrating, I read to relax and be entertained not to be pissed off [-( I gave up on page 50
I have read three of the Battletech books 'The Blood of Kerensky' trilogy, They were OK, I think I would have enjoyed them more if I knew more about the computer games they are associated with (No time for computer games :lol: ).
I read the first couple of Dragonlance books and decide they weren't my sort of book. :a009:


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PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 10:08 pm 
Tripod King

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Actually, the BattleTech series was written to supplement a futuristic wargame with miniatures of 'Mechs, tanks, etc. You were lucky in your ser ies, as Michael Stackpole is the best and most prolific of the writers employed by FASA for the original line of books. No one could portray futuristic warriors and politicians like he could. (I'm only using the past tense because we wasn't hired for the later series. The man himself is still very much alive.)

Sorry you're having trouble with the Hodgson links. Try looking for THE NIGHT LAND website or other Hodgson-related websites on your search engines. Also use the search engines to find the books of Clark Ashton Smith. He's the last of the great decadents; his writing uses lots of archaic language in a sensual and compelling manner. Aside from plain fantasy and sci fi tales, he also wrote short series of tales based in specific places: the imaginary medieval French province of Averoigne; Hyperborea, the first continent on Earth to be inhabited by humans; Poseidonis, the last remaining fragment of Atlantis (Smith subscribed to the notion that Atlantis sank one piece at a time, rather than all at once), Zothique, the last continent of Earth, with a black sky and stars that come out in the daytime with the sun, as well as at night; and Xiccarph, a planet in another solar system.
Some of the Smith books are collections of his world-specific tales, with a few other added: look for the titles Hyperborea, Poseidonis, Averoigne, Zothique, and Xiccarph. Also look for the titles The City of the Singing Flame, the Abominations of Yondo, A Rendezvous in Averoigne, The Double Shadow, Red World of Polaris, The Maker of Gargoyles, The End of the Story, The Door to Saturn, Lost Worlds, and Out of Space and Time.


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PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 12:12 am 
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Martian War Lord

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Cheers Alland I'll Google those an see what comes up, I have heard of 'The City of the Singing Flame' but only because of the Frank R. Paul cover art from the July 1931 issue of Wonder Stories.

I have also a couple of E.E. 'Doc' Smith's novels, the first two Skylark books on audio, the stories are technically quite advanced for their age but the stories themselves are laking in any literary merit, I think E.E Smith was probably a better physicist than he was a story teller.


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PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2008 9:35 pm 
Tripod King

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Getting back to an earlier query, Robert E. Howard is most famous as the creator of Conan the Barbarian. Don't let the stuff put out so far on TV and in the movies put you off; the original Conan tales were far better than that. Also, Howard was a highly prolific author, given his short life, and Conan was one of his last series characters.

This is a good time to get introduced to Howard's works via the regular bookstores, as most of this stuff has been reprinted in recent years. Del Rey Books (a division of Random House) just put out two trade paperbacks called "The Best of Robert E. Howard, 1 and 2", with the two volumes being subtitled "Crimson Shadows" and "Grim Lands". These contain what polled fans consider Howard's best work. There are several Conan stories in each volume, but also portrayed are Howard's other series characters, such as the Conan ancestor Kull of Atlantis; Bran Mak Morn, King of the Picts in Britain circa 200-250 A.D., the Puritan adventurer Solomon Kane; Irish sailor/boxer Steve Costigan; cowboy Breckenridge Elkins (other serial cowboy heros were Pike Bearfield and Buckner J. Grimes); dying man James Allison, who dreams of his heroic precious lives in stories like "The Valley of the Worm"; Dark Ages Irish outcast Turlough O'Brien; and former El Paso gunslinger Francis Xavier Gordon, who roams the Middle East and Northwest Fronter from late Victorian times to World War I under the Arab title "El Borak"-The Swift-due to his quick draw. There are also a pack of poems and unrelated stories, such as the western "The Vultures of Wapeton" and "The Grey God Passes" (a mystical version of the Battle of Clontarf with a guest appearance by Turlough O'Brien).

Del Rey also currently has in publication the trade paperbacks "The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian", "The Bloody Crown of Conan", "The Conquering Sword of Conan" (this trilogy has all Howard's original Conan tales), "The Savage Tales of Solomon Kane", "Bran Mak Morn: The Last King", and "Kull: Exile of Atlantis". Wildside Press has put out the historical adventure collections "Gates of Empire" and "Treasures of Tartary", as well as the boxing and western collection "The Complete Action Stories" (all Howard's stories printed in the pulp magazine of that name), and the horror collections "Shadow Kingdoms", "Moon of Skulls", "People of the Dark", and "Wings in the Night". Bison Books has put out the hardcover collections "The Riot at Bucksnort and Other Western Tales", "The Black Stranger and Other American Tales", and "Lord of Samarcand and Other Adventure Tales of the Old Orient". Also check the used-book dealers for the titles "Cormac Mac Art", "Skull-Face", "The Lost Valley of Iskander", "Sword Woman", and "Almuric", as these haven't been reprinted yet.


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PostPosted: Mon May 26, 2008 8:28 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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Sounds like a good idea to expand. We could agree to all read a book that we haven't read and once done discuss it.


Bah bah black sheap April diamond spheres, Rigsby, Rigsby, Eight sided Pears.


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PostPosted: Tue May 27, 2008 9:38 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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:a103: Ey by gum lad :a103: That's an old exclamation of surprise from where I come from.
That's one hell of a list of books to plough through!
As soon as you said Conan I remembered where I'd heard Robert E. Howard's name before, I've never read any of his books but I have read a couple of Conan books by Robert Jordan and although it's not really my sort of book I enjoyed them, I don't know how Jordan compares to Howard I'll have to find some of the original Conan stories and have a reading session. At the moment I'm reading a collection of short stories called 'The Ant-Men of Tibet' (as recommended by forum member McTodd) The title story, by Stephen Baxter is a sequel to 'The First Men in the Moon' a good story with an :a103: Oh My God! :a103: ending.


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PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 10:58 pm 
Tripod King

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There's a lot of repetition in those books; my main idea was that if I throw out enough titles, you'll be able to find at least a few handy, whether in the regular stores or with the used-book dealers.

Howard's stories have an intensity and headlong drive that his imitators and successors lack. Almost all of his original Conan stories were short stories, so a whole book listing him as the author or main author would be a collection of shorts. First Lancer Books, and then Ace Books, put out a series of paperbacks combining the entire original series with pastiches done by the likes of the late, great L. Sprague de Camp. The only novel-length Conan story written by Howard himself was "The Hour of the Dragon". An old specialty publisher put this out in hardcover, but since then, the story has usually been retitled "Conan the Conqueror".


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PostPosted: Thu May 29, 2008 7:05 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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My brother used to be a fan of the old Sci/fi and Fantasy stuff many years ago, he thinks he may still have some of the old Conan books, so I won't rush out and buy any just yet, I should know by Monday :D


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 10:00 pm 
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Martian War Lord

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Update:
The good news is my brother does have a lot of the Conan stories, the bad news is they are not in book form, they're in e-book form, not a problem I said, I can either read them from the monitor or print them out to read at my leisure. So today he handed me a bundle of 3½" floppy discs #-o , my PC doesn't have an old 3½" floppy discs drive ](*,) But I know someone who does.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2008 9:43 pm 
Tripod King

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Just remember that a good number of Conan short stories are pastiches written by other authors. Check the name of the author for each story to make sure its been written at least partially by Robert E. Howard. For instance, "The Treasure of Tranicos" was rewritten from an unsold pirate story about a minor series character called Black Vulmea, while "The Flame Knife" was an El Borak (Francis X. Gordon) adventure originally titled "Three-Bladed Doom". The rewrites consisted mostly of switching the setting to Conan's Hyborian Age and introducing supernatural elements. And the only full-length novel written by Howard about Conan is variously titled "The Hour of the Dragon" (the original title in Weird Tales) or "Conan the Conqueror".

Incidentally, if anyone reads the abovementioned novel, I think it would make a great epic fantasy movie or miniseries, with Arnold the Governor of California as Conan (again) and Sean Connery as the chief heavy, the wizard Xaltotun. Think of those guys in the roles the first---or next---time you read the story.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 12:44 am 
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Martian War Lord

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No luck with the floppy disks :a009: so I checked out the Internet and found this

http://gutenberg.net.au/plusfifty-a-m.html#letterH

If you go down the list to Robert Ervin HOWARD (1906-1936) there are dozens of books and short stories \:D/ I don't know why I didn't think of this sooner. #-o
Got to go now, got some reading to do :D


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 10:47 pm 
Tripod King

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So how's the reading coming?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:57 am 
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Martian War Lord

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Alland wrote:
So how's the reading coming?

Well since we last spoke I've been concentrating on my comic, but I have downloaded and read a couple of Howard's Conan books 'Queen of the Black Coast' and 'Red Nails' but I'm afraid I couldn't get into them.
All his characters are arrogant, belligerent and generally unlikeable so there's no one to empathize with, you don't care if they live or die. towards the end of 'Red Nails' I kept looking to see how many pages were left to go before the end which is never a good sign. :a009:

At the moment I'm reading a book written by my father called 'The Master Factor' and it's pretty good (well lets put it this way, I'm not counting the pages till the end yet :lol: ).

Have you seen there's a new WOTWs sequel out called 'The War of the Worlds: Aftermath'? penned by Tony Wright AKA eivilnerfherder. that's my next book.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 10, 2008 11:09 pm 
Tripod King

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Sorry you don't like Conan, but Howard's got plenty of other characters to choose from. Money's tight here at the moment, so my book-buying's on hold for the near future, at least. Fortunately, my private library's so large that I don't have to worry about reading material.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 12:04 am 
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Martian War Lord

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I'll probably try him again sometime, as you say there's plenty to choose from, he must have been quite a prolific writer considering he died at the age of thirty.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:12 pm 
Tripod King

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He was. This was the era of the pulp magazines, possibly the biggest market for writers that ever existed. Certainly the biggest market for beginning writers. Howard's main fantasy market, "Weird Tales", was by itself the magazine that gave the start for beginning writers like Ray Bradbury, future "Psycho" author Robert Bloch (who, like you, criticized Howard's Conan tales), and Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams. The magazine's regular writers ranged from Seabury Quinn, who also edited the trade journal for morticians at that time, "Casket and Sunnyside", to Episcopalian minister Henry S. Whitehead and ex-Marine Arthur J. Burks. Just reading about the pulp era itself makes for a fascinating read.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2008 1:19 am 
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Martian War Lord

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I know writers were paid a certain amount for every column inch they wrote in those golden days of science fiction.
I do prefer authors like A.C.Clarke John Wyndham. Isaac Asimov and of course H.G Well. I know most of these are Brit writers and I have nothing against Americans writers R.A Heinlein's The Moon is a Harsh Mistress is a wonderful book and some of Philip K. Dicks books are also very good, but I could never get excited by Robert Silverberg's work.
I think American writers are better at Horror than they are at Sci/Fi H.P Lovecraft and E.A Poe are probably two of my favourite horror authors.


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